Successful stagnation

I have been thinking about this a bit recently, particularly in connection with certain talented individuals I’ve come to know and admire, often with promising language combinations and talents, who seem to end up stagnating and getting overworked at the top end of the bulk market. To give an example, that could be people working between

How and who to help

Today I am inspired by a post by in The League of Extraordinary Translators, where a colleague asked what to say to qualified people who have never translated who have come to you for advice on how to succeed in translation. What advice to give The first part of this question is less problematic; essentially,

12 traps newbie translators fall into (Part 1/3)

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When I was just starting out, I fell into a lot of traps. I was taken advantage of, manipulated, ripped off and kept under the thumb. So many traps! But I am free now, and I'd like to expose some of these traps so others can tread safely. From tenders to test translations, from CV

Zombie contracts: Translators beware

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Have you ever wondered about those terms you are being asked to sign? Ever seen something that sent you running for the hills? I don’t know about you, but I have. Łukasz Gos-Furmankiewicz calls these “zombie contracts”, and he seems to know a bit about them. So I invited him for an interview to tell us all about them.

Building the Universal Translator: a translator’s perspective

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Science-fiction almost unanimously takes one vision of our future universe for granted: that all peoples shall be able to communicate with one another. The technology enabling this is generally known as the "Universal Translator": enabling interaction, profitable trade agreements, peaceful resolution of conflicts and cross-cultural understanding. The writer discusses how likely such a technology is.